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AMERICAN STUDIES EXTENDED UNIVERSITY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS - SPRING 2014

WEST SIDE COURSES – call 925-8669 for locations

 

 

185.001 - Intro to Race/Class/Ethnicity     MW     6:00 – 8:45     Owens     *2nd Eight Weeks

Arts & Sciences group: Social Sciences/Core Curriculum: Social Sciences

This is an interdisciplinary introduction to the issues, and social and cultural formation of race, class and ethnicity in American life and society.  The course is designed to foster an appreciation of the heterogeneity of experience in American life.  The course is focused on the study of cross-cultural group relations.

 

More specifically, this course will consider:

Who are you?  For most of us, self-description includes our race, class, and ethnicity, but what do these terms mean?  Are these terms fixed and unchanging?  This course introduces the terms, race, class and ethnicity and offers a critical discussion of their historical meaning and their meaning in modern society.  We will pay attention to cross-cultural and interdisciplinary themes within these definitions.

 

 

186.003 - Intro to Southwest Studies     M     9:00 – 2:00     Cordova     *2nd  Eight Weeks

Arts & Sciences group: Humanities/Core Curriculum: Humanities

Provides both an introduction to the complex history and culture of the southwestern United States and a demonstration of the possibilities of the interdisciplinary study of regional American culture.  It is multicultural in content and multidisciplinary in methodology.  Examines cross-cultural relationships among the peoples of the Southwest within the framework of their expressions and experiences in art, culture, religion, and social and political economy.

 

More specifically, this course will consider:

What is this place we call the Southwest?  How is it defined- geographically, politically, and culturally?  Who are the people that live there?  How have their lives been transformed by social and historical forces into the cultures we see today?  At the same time, how have these same groups retained their traditions, customs, and beliefs in response to change?  This course will explore contemporary Southwestern cultures, their multiple voices and culture expressions, using an interdisciplinary approach that draws from geography, anthropology, history, literature, and the arts.

 

 

201.004 - Introduction to Chicana/o Studies     T     9:00 – 2:00     Cordova     *2nd Eight weeks

Arts & Sciences group: Humanities

This course is offered with CCS 201, Introduction to Chicana and Chicano Studies.

This course is will introduce students to the field of Chicano/a Studies and provide an introductory exploration of historical, political, social, and cultural dimensions of the Mexican American experience in the United States, with special reference to New Mexico.

 

 

330.002 - Chuck & Chick Flicks     F     10:00 – 3:00     Gravagne     *2nd Eight Weeks

Arts & Sciences group: Humanities

This course focuses on the interdisciplinary study of the construction of gender. Through watching films such as The BirdcageNorth Country, Rabbit Proof Fence, and The Help, and reading about how gender is represented, normalized, disciplined, and contested, we will learn how the relationship of gender to sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, class, and age affects all our lives.

 

 

330.003 - Feminist Theories     F     10:00 – 3:00     Gravagne     *1st Eight Weeks

Arts & Sciences group: Humanities

What is feminist theory?  How does it go about depicting and rearranging the meanings of the world in order to reveal something new about the inconsistencies and injustices we live with?  How does it not only interpret the needs and desires of the world but bring them into being?  Through an examination of a variety of feminist theories—liberal, cultural, Marxist, Freudian, existentialist, radical, postmodern, ecofeminist, and third wave—we will see how feminist theory opens up a breathing space between the everyday world and other possible worlds, a space in which intellectual tools for building knowledge of identity and oppression can be acquired, and political strategies for resisting subordination and domination can be developed. By looking at how feminist theory has played, and continues to play, a part in debates on issues such as personhood, equal pay and equal rights, abortion, sexual orientation, and environmental justice, we will discover how crucial its role is in the allocation of power and the construction of a more just and democratic world.

 

 

340.005 - UFO’s in America     F     10:00 – 3:00     Dewan     *2nd Eight weeks

Arts & Sciences group: Humanities

This course traces the emergence and continued subsistence of the UFO phenomenon in American culture, from its origins in the Cold War era to its prosperousness in the Internet Age. In dealing with topics such as contemporary folk traditions, Cold War paranoia, conspiracy culture, and new religious movements, this course will teach students to critically examine how contemporary belief systems are formulated and integrated into popular culture, as well as how these beliefs inhabit “battlegrounds” of meaning between modern rationalist and quasi-religious ideologies.

 

 

343.001 - Urban Legends     F     10:00 – 3:00     Dewan     *1st Eight weeks

Arts and Sciences group: Humanities

This course is an exploration of urban legends in contemporary culture.  We will explore recurring themes and means of transmission, as well as the cultural meanings and interpretations that have been ascribed to them.  Our readings and discussions will examine the underlying components of these stories, including issues of race, class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and ideology.

 

350.009 - Borderland Roles of Women     W     9:00 – 2:00     Cordova     *2nd Eight weeks

Arts & Sciences group: Humanities

 

 

 

Online Courses

For more information, special technology fees and computer requirements, please go to the Online and Distance Education Website at http://statewide.unm.edu/

 

 

182.004 - Intro to Environment, Science & Tech                         Abbott

182.007 - Intro to Environment, Science & Tech                         Cleaver

182.008 - Intro to Environment, Science & Tech                         Berger

Arts & Sciences group:  Social Science / Core Curriculum: Social Science

This is an introduction to American attitudes toward nature, science, technology and the impacts of those attitudes on built and natural environments regionally, nationally and globally.  This course covers the period from World War II to the present, focusing on the environmental effects of such diverse scientific and technological products as chemical pesticides, nuclear power, and television.

 

More specifically, this course will consider:

In this course we will look at current environmental issues, delving into contentious topics and passionate debates, while asking difficult questions.  How does consumerism impact the environment, and how much stuff do we really need?  Is wilderness a necessity or a luxury?  Should an endangered fish have water rights? Are pesticides giving us cancer? We'll consider debates within the scientific community, explore conflicts between developers and environmentalists, and look at the promise and limitations of technological solutions. 

 

 

183.002 - Introduction to Gender Studies                               Fishken-Harkins 

Arts & Sciences group:  Humanities

This course focuses on the interdisciplinary study of the construction of gender as a category.  Readings will span cross-cultural and historical materials, including literary, artistic, and popular representations of masculinity and femininity in America.

 

More specifically, this course will consider:

What does it mean to be or become a woman or man?  Is there a basic essence to femininity and masculinity, which remains unchanged throughout time and place?  Or are our concepts of what constitutes femininity and masculinity historically and culturally specific and mutable?  What are the processes and mechanisms by which our understandings of gender are produced, maintained, or changed?  This course addresses these questions, offering students a stimulating, accessible introduction to the depth and breadth of work on gender from an interdisciplinary perspective.  The field of gender studies is dynamic and diverse, full of debate, controversy, and inquiry over issues of representation, identity, meaning, interpretation, and politics.  We will explore these issues through contemporary writings on gender that intersect with sex, race, sexuality, and class.  As much as this course is an introduction to a body of work – both scholarly and popular, written and visual - that focuses on gender, it is also a course that interrogates the material.  Thus students will be working on their critical reading/ writing skills.

 

 

184.006 - Intro to American Pop Culture                                   Gurule

Arts & Sciences group: Humanities

Popular culture can be defined as the beliefs and practices that characterize a particular culture, as well as the objects, narratives, and rituals through which they are organized and that are widely shared, enjoyed, and understood among a population.  It is also generally understood as the culture of ordinary people, as opposed to highly educated or specialized elites.

 

This course examines many aspects of popular culture, including movies, action figures and other toys, cartoons/comics, advertising, television, and urban legends. The class involves learning how to read popular culture as a text and as an indicator of societal norms, diversions, and diversities.

 

 

185.006 - Intro to Race/Class/Ethnicity                                    Madrigal

185.007 - Intro to Race/Class/Ethnicity                                    McSherry

Arts & Sciences group: Social Sciences/Core Curriculum: Social Sciences

This is an interdisciplinary introduction to the issues, and social and cultural formation of race, class and ethnicity in American life and society.  The course is designed to foster an appreciation of the heterogeneity of experience in American life.  The course is focused on the study of cross-cultural group relations.

 

More specifically, this course will consider:

Who are you?  For most of us, self-description includes our race, class, and ethnicity, but what do these terms mean?  Are these terms fixed and unchanging?  This course introduces the terms, race, class and ethnicity and offers a critical discussion of their historical meaning and their meaning in modern society.  We will pay attention to cross-cultural and interdisciplinary themes within these definitions.

 

 

186.007 - Intro to Southwest Studies                                         Eleshuk Roybal

186.008 - Intro to Southwest Studies                                         Barajas

Arts & Sciences group: Humanities/Core Curriculum: Humanities

Provides both an introduction to the complex history and culture of the southwestern United States and a demonstration of the possibilities of the interdisciplinary study of regional American culture.  It is multicultural in content and multidisciplinary in methodology. Examines cross-cultural relationships among the peoples of the Southwest within the framework of their expressions and experiences in art, culture, religion, and social and political economy.

 

More specifically, this course will consider:

What is this place we call the Southwest?  How is it defined- geographically, politically, and culturally?  Who are the people that live there?  How have their lives been transformed by social and historical forces into the cultures we see today?  At the same time, how have these same groups retained their traditions, customs, and beliefs in response to change?  This course will explore contemporary Southwestern cultures, their multiple voices and culture expressions, using an interdisciplinary approach that draws from geography, anthropology, history, literature, and the arts.

 

 

200.001 - Comparative Global Society                                         Winder

Arts & Sciences group: Humanities

This course is offered with CCS102.001, Introduction to Comparative Ethnic and Global Societies.

The course explores historical and contemporary social forces that impact ethnic communities across the Americas. Students will examine social and economic dynamics of Indigenous, Latino, Asian-Pacific, Africana communities and women’s experiences.

 

 

201.001 - Introduction to Chicana and Chicano Studies              Garcia

Arts & Sciences group: Humanities

This course is offered with CCS 201, Introduction to Chicana and Chicano Studies.

This course is will introduce students to the field of Chicano/a Studies and provide an introductory exploration of historical, political, social, and cultural dimensions of the Mexican American experience in the United States, with special reference to New Mexico.

 

 

330.048 - Black Women of the Civil Rights Movement                 Hardeman

Arts & Sciences group:  Humanities

This course is offered with AFST 397.048, Women of the Civil Rights Movement. A course description should be requested from the Africana Studies program.

 

 

340.001 - Cultural Studies                                                              Díaz

Arts & Sciences group: Humanities 

This course is offered with CCS 365, Chicana/o Cultural Studies.

This course is an examination of contemporary Chicana/o literature, criticism, murals, film, and other forms of popular culture, with an emphasis on the construction and representation of Chicana/o cultural identity.

 


 

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