Dual Core Credit

Not sure what courses you want to take?  Check out a Dual Core Credit course!  You may be interested in just sampling great required UNM courses offered by some of the best instructors at UNM.  And all credits generated in this category count towards UNM's Core Curriculum.  Fast-Track through UNM's core curriculum and have fun in the process!

Dancing Through Time: From the Cave to Krump

Dancing Through Time: From the Cave to Krump - FLC 602

This Learning Community will explore an array of ideas about the place of dance in our lives, exposing our class to a wide variety of dance works and the cultures they express. In this lecture-based FLC, we will learn about and attempt a range of dances from the Waltz to East Coast Swing, Ballet to Hip Hop. We will read about, think about, write about, and talk about dance as work, play, worship, and art.

Combines: DANC 105ENGL 102
Meets: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Dane Smith Hall 231
TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Dane Smith Hall 231
CRN: 5001046982
What's Up With People?

What's Up With People? - FLC 606

Being a person has never been easy, and achieving your goals in life will take some major skill.  In this FLC we will set off to discover what makes people tick.  As a group, we will identify and explore the core dimensions underlying human behavior.  Topics will include human thought and perception, learning, motivation, creativity and intelligence.  We will explore the influences of the nervous system, development, and the social environment on human behavior.   We will contrast normal patterns of human behavior with examples of behaviors that are, well, ‘abnormal’.  With the assistance of our link with English 101, we will use a variety of classroom approaches to actively engage each of these topics in the deepest way possible.  At every point along the way, we will pause to consider how theory and research in psychology relates to the important issues in your life.  You will leave this class with a broad foundation in general psychology, quite prepared to advance your study of psychology through additional coursework, if you choose.  Importantly, we also hope you leave with deeper insight into people, greater self-awareness, and the wisdom to better understand and accomplish your goals. 

Combines: PSY 105ENGL 102
Meets: MWF 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM
Mitchell Hall 105
MWF 1:00 PM - 1:50 PM
Ortega Hall 221
CRN: 5021633362
Sociology of Art

Sociology of Art - FLC 608

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the discipline of sociology and to some major issues in the study of society using two methods. First, we will clarify society by recourse to its social scientific terms, using some of the standard concepts and theories in the field of sociology. Second, we shall explore society with the assistance of the artist’s eye. Not only can sociology be considered an art form- that is, through the various social “visions” that come out of the sociological imagination- but also because artists themselves often have a sociological vision in mind, or wish to make a sociological point, in their aesthetic creations. We shall take advantage of the wealth of artistic resources available in Albuquerque and New Mexico. Students will be invited to discover how sociological interpretations are to be found in painting, drawing, muralism, sculpture, photography and cinema. We may as a class take in a local art gallery or explore the many types of artistic production to be found on campus or catch a flick in order to help gain a comprehensive out-line of “society.”

Combines: CJ 130SOC 101
Meets: TR 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Mitchell Hall 207
TR 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 207
CRN: 4685846857
Microbial Ecology

Microbial Ecology - FLC 609

Microbes are so small you can’t see them, but they can kill you!  Microbes cause strep throat, H1N1, colds and many really horrific diseases such as Ebola, bird flu, and Hantavirus and they can help determine whether you’re thin or fat.  Other microbes are truly the engineers of our planet, helping to make the air we breathe and the food and drink we consume.  We’ll explore myths and truths about microbes and their interactions with humans and the environment.  Classroom activities and assignments will focus on growing microbes, disease investigation simulations, illustrated lectures, and fieldtrips to hot springs, a lava tube, a brewery, a medical lab, and the waste water treatment plant.  The ideas that you encounter in the seminar will be carried over into English 101, where you will write and think critically about issues dealing with microbes.  The classes are closely linked with similar learning outcomes and shared assignments, including a final project (Microbe Blog!).

Combines: BIOL 110ENGL 102
Meets: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Dane Smith Hall 232
TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Dane Smith Hall 232
CRN: 5001450015
Your Language Questions Answered

Your Language Questions Answered - FLC 614

An introduction to the nature of language that satisfies everyday curiosities about language and that introduces students to the structure of language (sounds, words, sentences, meanings).  Other topics covered include child language acquisition, language change, social dialects, bilingualism, signed languages, animal communication, language and thought, and more.  In this Learning Community, students will work in teams to develop a language system, will learn to think critically about data analysis, and will use their linked English 102 skills to write a report on a final data collection project.  No background in linguistics, grammar, and/or other languages is assumed.

Combines: ENGL 102LING 101
Meets: MWF 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Mitchell Hall 216
MWF 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM
Mitchell Hall 216
CRN: 4686446865
Civil Rights Movement & the Law

Civil Rights Movement & the Law - FLC 617

This FLC introduces students to the rich and vibrant experiences that have shaped the development of diverse Chicana and Chicano communities in the United States. The course illustrates how people of Mexican descent and the communities they inhabit have experienced political intrusions and, at the same time, maintained rich and vibrant cultures in the U.S. borderlands region and in U.S. society in general. Students, in the company of their FLC instructors, will visit cultural and historical sites of significance in the New Mexico region and understand how issues of race, class, gender and sexuality continue to influence dynamic Mexican American communities and cultures.

Combines: CCS 201
Meets: TR 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Mitchell Hall 213
CRN: 49994
Burning Harry Potter?

Burning Harry Potter? - FLC 620

This Community is Full

If you need to take English 101, this is an opportunity to write essays about the kinds of books that you love to read. In the Seminar we will examine the ways in which literature for children and young adults is governed by the social, religious, and political influences that a particular community may embrace. Should children’s books focus on topics such as child abuse? Should fairy tales be censored? While we may not be able to resolve these issues, we will emerge from this class with a better understanding of the interaction between community values, censorship, and children’s books. Students enrolled in this FLC will use books, critical readings, class discussion activities, and lectures as a way to develop their expository writing skills.

Combines: ENGL 101
Meets:
CRN: 50173
Earth Arts: A Wild Way of Knowing

Earth Arts: A Wild Way of Knowing - FLC 623

Explore New Mexico’s beauty, grandeur, and fragility through the arts.  Learn how artists are creating community around common appreciation and concerns for the environment.  We’ll discover artists whose creative processes engage the natural environment in ways that make us see our own creative possibilities in the wild as well as in the urban jungle.  Assignments include field trips to site-specific earthworks to inspire the creation of earth artworks in small groups and individually.  We’ll learn how critical thinking is the key to unlocking your creative spirit.  In this seminar and your other UNM classes you will work with types of texts, lectures, exams and assignments that are new to you.  Your ENGL 101 class in this FLC will help you learn how to effectively work with and learn from these college level materials. 

Combines: FA 284ENGL 102
Meets: TR 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 108
TR 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Mitchell Hall 108
CRN: 5016350162
Porcelain Perspectives

Porcelain Perspectives - FLC 633

This Community is Full

“Porcelain Perspectives" is a “hands on” art studio experience that introduces you to the terms, concepts, historical and technical information that support creative development. The amazing properties of porcelain will be discovered through the techniques of hand building and throwing.  Glaze, oxidation, reduction and atmospheric firing are taught. Readings and lectures are included and guest artists will speak. You will view and research contemporary and historic porcelain images from ArtStor, galleries, and online resources. This learning laboratory environment will promote a life-long enjoyment of ceramics and its diverse reflections of human development, with an emphasis on the aesthetic and historic qualities porcelain possesses.  Your own porcelain creations will reflect an exciting studio experience in the UNM College of Fine Arts.

Combines: ENGL 101ARTS 168
Meets: TR 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Mitchell Hall 118
TR 2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Art
CRN: 5031650021
Love, Lust, and Passion

Love, Lust, and Passion - FLC 634

“In this FLC we will seek to understand the differences between love, lust, and passion as presented in literature and film. We will read a novel, a play, short stories, poems, and nonfiction texts. We will also view films that depict a variety of human relationships. In our discussions, we will analyze the relationships in connection to our own lives. How can we learn from both the good examples and mistakes of others, real or fictional? Students will keep journals, write three 2 page response papers, a love poem, one 3-4 page memoir, and a final 6-8 page research project. They will also give an oral presentation that is based on the research project. We will attend an artistic performance related to our discussions and hold an Academy Awards day.

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Acting I

Acting I - FLC 637

In this FLC, we will explore the basic fundamentals of acting through various exercises that will teach us improvisation and many theatre techniques.  We will develop our imaginative, physical and emotional skills as actors and dive into what it means to portray different characters.  In your English 101 course, the papers you write and discussions you have will reflect what you have learned in Theatre 130, and you will transfer you knowledge from one discipline to another.

Combines: ENGL 101THEA 130
Meets: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 109
TR 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Mitchell Hall 109
CRN: 5000846983
Invitation to Archaeology

Invitation to Archaeology - FLC 646

Archaeology provides our only window into the deep human past, allowing us to understand people whose histories are unrecorded or only partially known through written accounts.  But how do archaeologists reconstruct the past?  How do they know what past people ate, how they treated the environment, what their families and communities were like, what they believed in, whom they fought with and why, and how they governed themselves?  And how do archaeologists squeeze all of this information from fragmentary remains and layers of dirt?  By the end of this class, you will be able to answer these questions, and more. Armed with this knowledge you will not only impress friends, family, and perfect strangers, but you will also have a stronger foundation from which to see and understand the human condition.  The course will combine lectures, discussion, and a hands-on lab and will be paired with related writing assignments in English 102.

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Invitation to Archaeology

Invitation to Archaeology - FLC 647

Archaeology provides our only window into the deep human past, allowing us to understand people whose histories are unrecorded or only partially known through written accounts.  But how do archaeologists reconstruct the past?  How do they know what past people ate, how they treated the environment, what their families and communities were like, what they believed in, whom they fought with and why, and how they governed themselves?  And how do archaeologists squeeze all of this information from fragmentary remains and layers of dirt?  By the end of this class, you will be able to answer these questions, and more. Armed with this knowledge you will not only impress friends, family, and perfect strangers, but you will also have a stronger foundation from which to see and understand the human condition.  The course will combine lectures, discussion, and a hands-on lab and will be paired with related writing assignments in English 102.

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