International Studies

As we continue to live in a Global Economy, it is essential for UNM students to prepare to serve the world.  These courses give students a great foundations in international relations, foreign affairs, or for those interested in entering study abroad programs at UNM.

Service Learning in Zambia

Service Learning in Zambia - FLC 648

The aim of this course is to introduce students to three areas of study (service learning, teaching training, and Zambian culture and history) as well as to prepare them for possible participation in a teaching training service learning project in Livingstone, Zambia.  The course primarily targets undergraduate students who have interests and future plans in the fields of teaching, charitable organizations, and international diplomacy, business, and NGO work, but all students are welcome.  The course will be led by Professor Stephen Bishop, who is also organizing the related Summer field course in Zambia, but will have a variety of expert lecturers throughout the semester.

Combines: CJ 130
Meets: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Univ Advise & Enrich Center B91
CRN: 50170
Service Learning in Zambia

Service Learning in Zambia - FLC 649

The aim of this course is to introduce students to three areas of study (service learning, teaching training, and Zambian culture and history) as well as to prepare them for possible participation in a teaching training service learning project in Livingstone, Zambia.  The course primarily targets undergraduate students who have interests and future plans in the fields of teaching, charitable organizations, and international diplomacy, business, and NGO work, but all students are welcome.  The course will be led by Professor Stephen Bishop, who is also organizing the related Summer field course in Zambia, but will have a variety of expert lecturers throughout the semester.

Combines: CJ 130
Meets: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Univ Advise & Enrich Center B91
CRN: 50171
Modern Ireland

Modern Ireland - FLC 650

This Community is Full

The story of Ireland since 1800 is the history of transformation. The country went from being an island outpost on the edge of Europe to a hotspot at the center of the global economy, from a symbol of imperial oppression to an exporter of culture in its own right, from a land of priests and poets to a land of priests, poets, multimillionaire airline moguls, holistic management consultants and international pop star diplomats. Since the crash of 2008, it has undergone another transformation—looking up from the bottom of the Eurozone, many Irish now wonder if the “Celtic Tiger” economic boom was all a dream. Ten years ago, Irish expatriates around the world began returning home to look for work; today, the old adage that “Ireland’s greatest export has always been people” seems truer than ever. But despite all of this change, it still means something to be Irish—and not just to the Irish, and not just around St. Patrick’s Day. In this course, we will use both historical sources and plays to investigate not just what makes Ireland Ireland, but what makes a nation a nation.

Combines: ENGL 315HIST 300
Meets: TR 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
Science Math Learning Center 352
TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Science Math Learning Center 352
CRN: 5016734751