Natural Sciences

Our knowledge of the world is created by our understanding of the planet we walk upon every day.  These FLCs help give some foundation to your understanding of the world that moves above us, below us, and all around.

Microbial Ecology

Microbial Ecology - FLC 609

Microbes are so small you can’t see them, but they can kill you!  Microbes cause strep throat, H1N1, colds and many really horrific diseases such as Ebola, bird flu, and Hantavirus and they can help determine whether you’re thin or fat.  Other microbes are truly the engineers of our planet, helping to make the air we breathe and the food and drink we consume.  We’ll explore myths and truths about microbes and their interactions with humans and the environment.  Classroom activities and assignments will focus on growing microbes, disease investigation simulations, illustrated lectures, and fieldtrips to hot springs, a lava tube, a brewery, a medical lab, and the waste water treatment plant.  The ideas that you encounter in the seminar will be carried over into English 101, where you will write and think critically about issues dealing with microbes.  The classes are closely linked with similar learning outcomes and shared assignments, including a final project (Microbe Blog!).

Combines: BIOL 110ENGL 102
Meets: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Dane Smith Hall 232
TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Dane Smith Hall 232
CRN: 5001450015
Biology of Toxins

Biology of Toxins - FLC 613

Sex, drugs, and rock-&-roll - what’s the connection?  What’s up with Botox? Why is anthrax so fearsome?  Can we depend on the FDA to ensure that the medicines we take are safe?  These and other questions will be explored as we study natural and manmade toxins and delve into the uses - including bioterrorism and drug abuse - that man makes of these diverse and ubiquitous compounds.  Lectures will examine the physiology, biochemistry, and medical uses of naturally-occurring toxins, while student-conducted discussions of the medical, psychological, and sociological ramifications of topics covered in lecture will be used to enhance students’ learning experience.  Finally, students working in small teams will research a toxicology topic of their choosing, and discuss their results during an oral presentation.  In ENGL 102 you will improve your writing and critical analysis skills through expository compositions and in-class debates based on these topics.

Combines: ARSC 198ENGL 102
Meets: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Mitchell Hall 216
TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall 216
CRN: 4686246863
Invitation to Archaeology

Invitation to Archaeology - FLC 646

Archaeology provides our only window into the deep human past, allowing us to understand people whose histories are unrecorded or only partially known through written accounts.  But how do archaeologists reconstruct the past?  How do they know what past people ate, how they treated the environment, what their families and communities were like, what they believed in, whom they fought with and why, and how they governed themselves?  And how do archaeologists squeeze all of this information from fragmentary remains and layers of dirt?  By the end of this class, you will be able to answer these questions, and more. Armed with this knowledge you will not only impress friends, family, and perfect strangers, but you will also have a stronger foundation from which to see and understand the human condition.  The course will combine lectures, discussion, and a hands-on lab and will be paired with related writing assignments in English 102.

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Invitation to Archaeology

Invitation to Archaeology - FLC 647

Archaeology provides our only window into the deep human past, allowing us to understand people whose histories are unrecorded or only partially known through written accounts.  But how do archaeologists reconstruct the past?  How do they know what past people ate, how they treated the environment, what their families and communities were like, what they believed in, whom they fought with and why, and how they governed themselves?  And how do archaeologists squeeze all of this information from fragmentary remains and layers of dirt?  By the end of this class, you will be able to answer these questions, and more. Armed with this knowledge you will not only impress friends, family, and perfect strangers, but you will also have a stronger foundation from which to see and understand the human condition.  The course will combine lectures, discussion, and a hands-on lab and will be paired with related writing assignments in English 102.

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