HDLS-2
Conference Schedule


FRIDAY, March 26th




830-915 REGISTRATION

915-930 WELCOME ADDRESS

930-1000
Image Schema Blending and the Construal of Events: A Cross-Linguistic Account of GO-AND-V
Anatol Stefanowitsch, Rice University

1000-1030
English and Spanish Conjunctive Predicates
Ivo Sanchez, University of California, Santa Barbara

1030-1100
A Synchronic Study of 'have to' and 'got to' with Diachronic Implications
Dawn Nordquist, University of New Mexico

1100-1115  BREAK

1115-1145
Wyandot Phonology: Recovering the Sound System of an Extinct Language
Craig Kopris, State University of New York at Buffalo

1145-1215
Monastic and Natural Sign Language: A New Look
Dan Parvaz, University of New Mexico

1215-1245
Fluid French Boundaries in Louisiana
Megan E. Melançon, Louisiana State University

1245-200  LUNCH

200-300
Interaction and Grammar: Transitivity and Argument Structure in Conversation
KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Dr. SANDY THOMPSON, University of California, Santa Brabara

300-315  BREAK

315-345
On Managing Sign Complexity in Sign Language Recognition
Christian Vogler and Dimitris Metaxas, U of Penn

345-415
Multilingual Lexical Representation: Structure-Sharing versus Micro-Features
Carole Tiberius, ITRI, University of Brighton

415-430  BREAK

430-500
English to American Sign Language Machine Translation of Weather Reports
Angus B. Grieve-Smith, University of New Mexico

500-530
Using Multiple Machine Translation Packages to Produce "Averaged" Results
Dan Tappan, Computing Reasearch Laboratory, New Mexico State University


SATURDAY, March 27th

900-930  Registration

930-1000
Synchronic and Diachronic Perspectives on Negative Modals in ASL
Barbara Shaffer, University of New Mexico

1000-1030
Where is the Spanish 'go' Progressive Going?
Frequency Constraints on the Pace of Grammaticization
Rena Torres Cacoullos, University of New Mexico

1030-1100
The Aspectual System of Chiyao
Alfred J. Matiki, University of New Mexico

1100-1115  BREAK

1115-1145
Grammaticization of the Direct Object marker 'o' in Written Japanese: A Discourse-Based Study
Misumi Sadler, University of Arizona

1145-1215
On the Subjectification of Japanese Connective 'tara'
Sono Takano Hayes, Carnegie Mellon University, and Rumiko Shinzato, Georgia Institute of Technology

1215-1230  BREAK

1230-100
The Consequences of Token Frequency, Transitional Probablility, and Non-Random Distributions of Lexical Segments: A Causal  Explanation for Word-Boundary Palatalization Phenomena in English
Nathan Bush, University of New Mexico

100-130
The Role of Alternating Phonetic Environments and Word Frequency in the Development of Latin F- in Spanish
Esther L. Brown, University of New Mexico

130-230  LUNCH

230-300
Semantic-Pragmatic Account for Dative-Subject Construction in Japanese
Kyoko Masuda, University of Arizona

300-330
Transitivity and Viewpoint in Japanese Giving and Receiving Verbs
Soichi Kozai, University of Hawaii

330-345  BREAK

345-415
The Continuity of "Agreement": From Pre-Linguistic Action Gestures to ASL Verbs
Shannon Casey, University of California, San Diego

415-445
A Survey of Distributed Pronominal Affix Systems
Jordan Lachler, University of New Mexico

445-500  BREAK

500-530
Personal Pronouns in Chinese and English
GU Gang, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

530-600
Address Forms in Chinese and their Interactional Functions
YANG Jun, University of Arizona


SUNDAY, March 28th

930-1000
Parataxis in Old English: Evidence from Translation
K. Aaron Smith, University of New Mexico

1000-1030
An Analysis of Passive Constructions in Thai
Unchalee Singnoi, University of Oregon

1030-1045  BREAK

1045-1115
The Psychological Reality of 'which' Constructions
Catie Berkenfield, University of New Mexico

1115-1145
The Emergence of Inflection: The Case of Spanish -y in 'soy', 'doy', 'voy', 'estoy'
Myriam Eguia, University of New Mexico

1145-1200  BREAK

1200-1230
Focus and Quotative 'like': A Necessary Dichotomy?
Andrew Tistadt, University of New Mexico

1230-100
Lavender Languages, Pink Triangles and a Rainbow Flag:
Male Sexual Orientation and English Color Term Usage
Paul J. Weiss and Robert Hahn, University of New Mexico


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