JOURNAL of
ANTHROPOLOGICAL
RESEARCH
Volume 49, Number 1, Abstracts


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VALUES UNDER SIEGE IN MEXICO: STRATEGIES FOR SHELTERING TRADITIONAL VALUES FROM CHANGE

Linda J. Hubbell
Department of Anthropology, Trent University, Peterborough, ON K9J 7B8, Canada

Mexico's economic crisis in the 1970s and 1980s forced middle-class families to send the wife into the work force or contemplate falling in class status. Traditional middle-class values militated against decline into the lower class, because of its assoc iations with manual labor and lack of cultura. Although sending the wife and mother to work outside the home was also contrary to traditional Mexican cultural construction of gender and family, many Uruapan middle-class couples rationalized the wife's in come-producing work by using strategies such as concealing, reinterpreting, or not directly challenging the traditional values. Despite Uruapan middle-class resistance to the transformations of the last twenty years, real changes in areas like acceptance of married women in the workplace, sharing domestic labor, fertility control, and equality between spouses in family decision making have begun to appear.


FUZZINESS AND PHENOMENOLOGY IN ETHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH: INSIGHTS FROM FUZZY SET THEORY

Charles D. Laughlin
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Carleton University,

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada KlS 5B6

The Insights behind fuzzy set theory are summarized and related to research on categorization. The concept of fuzziness is evaluated relative to the demands of an essentially cross-cultural, phenomenological enterprise. An "experiential proximity hypoth esis" is developed by combining the notion of fuzziness with the Whiteheadian notion of "extensive abstraction." The potential power of these concepts for understanding both the symbol-experience relationship in rituals and other cultural phenomena and i nformant reports of experience is emphasized. The concept of fuzziness is applied to esoteric concepts, categories, and symbols in systems of contemplation. Contemplation based upon Buddhist categories of consciousness is given as an example.


HUNTER-GATHERER SOCIAL COSTS AND THE NONVIABILITY OF SUBMARGINAL ENVIRONMENTS

Carole A. Stein Mandryk
Department of Anthropology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2H4

A review of general principles of hunter-gatherer adaptations and their applicability in such marginal environments as arctic and desert ecosystems provides a basis for modelling behavior in submarginal environments. It is determined that submarginal env ironments are nonviable because it is inpossible to meet both economic and social needs within the constraints imposed by extremely impoverished ecosystems.


REVIEW ARTICLE: INFANT DEATH IN NORTHEAST BRAZIL

Sara Hiat
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131

(no abstract)


BOOK REVIEWS

Ethnobiological Classification: Principles of Categorization of Plants and Animals in Traditional Societies. Brent Berlin. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1992, xi + 335 pp., $45.00 (cloth). Reviewed by Cecile H. Brown, Nort hern Illinois University.

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