JOURNAL of 
ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH

Volume 69, Number 3, Abstracts

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Contents

Linda S. Cordell (1943–2013)

T. Patrick Culbert (1930-2013)

David M. Brugge (1927–2013)

The Indian Fashion Show: Fighting Cultural Stereotypes with Gender
by Nancy Parezo

The Contract with God: Patterns of Cultural Consensus across Two Brazilian Religious Communities
by H. J. François Dengah, II

Evidence of a Neanderthal Quartz-Based Technology in Navalmaillo Rockshelter (Pinilla del Valle, Madrid Region, Spain)
by B. Márquez, M. Mosquera, E. Baquedano, A. Pérez-González, J. L. Arsuaga, J. Panera, J. A. Espinosa, and J. Gómez

Neanderthal Graphic Behavior: The Pecked Pebble from Axlor Rockshelter (Northern Spain).
by Marcos García-Diez, Blanca Ochoa Fraile, and Ignacio Barandiarán Maestu

Book Reviews


Linda S. Cordell (1943–2013)

T. Patrick Culbert (1930-2013)

David M. Brugge (19272013)


The Indian Fashion Show: Fighting Cultural Stereotypes with Gender

Nancy J. Parezo
Department of American Indian Studies, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

KEYWORDS: Stereotypes, Stereotyping, Clothing, Fashion, Exhibits, Representation, Gender

ABSTRACT: Every American knows what an American Indian should look like. It is general American popular culture knowledge. But what most Americans in the 1930s through the 1950s “knew” was not reality, it was an iconic Indian seen through the lens of essentializing American stereotypes. Anthropologists have long considered it part of their moral agenda to replace the cultural misinformation and overgeneralizations that ground stereotypes with culturally accurate information in order to eliminate prejudice, discrimination, and assumptions. This paper constitutes a case study of one anthropologist’s attempts to eliminate entrenched, negative racial, ethnic, and cultural stereotypes about American Indians through stereotype transference, respect for cultural variation, and content eradication, espousing gender as the critical universal commonality that will eliminate discrimination. Frederic Douglas’s innovative living display, the Indian Fashion Show, is embedded within a theoretical discussion of stereotyping as a sociocultural process.


The Contract with God: Patterns of Cultural Consensus across Two Brazilian Religious Communities

H. J. François Dengah II
School of Anthropology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

KEYWORDS: Cultural models, Cultural consensus analysis, Methods, Religion, Pentecostals, Brazil

ABSTRACT: Understanding contested cultural boundaries continues to be a theoretical and empirical issue for anthropologists. For some time, cognitive and other like-minded anthropologists have used cultural consensus analysis (CCA), developed by Romney, Weller, and Batchelder (1986), to quantitatively estimate the level of cultural sharing around a particular domain. This method has limits and, as its critics (fairly or unfairly) have pointed out, can present a static, homogeneous image of culture. Residual agreement analysis (RAA) helps address this lacuna. This extension of CCA can identify subcultural variation and elicit the structural nature of such shared deviation. Utilizing data from Brazilian Pentecostals, CCA demonstrates that this community shares a model of lifestyle success known as A Vida Completa. Residual agreement analysis, however, shows systematic deviations from the overall cultural consensus across two congregations. This finding suggests that the distinction between how these two churches conceive of A Vida Completa may not be due to unique cultural beliefs but rather to differential emphasis of an underlying shared cultural model. This research demonstrates a novel extension of CCA and provides insights into the characteristics of Brazil’s fastest growing religious community.


Evidence of a Neanderthal Quartz-Based Technology in Navalmaillo Rockshelter (Pinilla del Valle, Madrid Region, Spain)

B. Márquez
Museo Arqueológico Regional, Madrid, Spain.

M. Mosquera
Área de Prehistoria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, and Institut de Paleoecologia Humana I Evolució Social (IPHES), Tarragona, Spain

E. Baquedano
Museo Arqueológico Regional, Madrid, Spain.

A. Pérez-González
Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), Burgos, Spain

J. L. Arsuaga
Centro Mixto UCM-ISCIII de Evolución y Comportamiento Humanos, Madrid, Spain

J. Panera
Institute of Evolution in Africa (IDEA), Museo de San Isidro, Madrid, Spain

J. A. Espinosa
Estudios Arqueológicos ARQUEO S.C., Spain

 J. Gómez
Arqueoestrato S.L., Madrid, Spain

KEYWORDS: Navalmaíllo rockshelter, Raw material selection, Quartz, Microliths,
Neanderthals, Spain

ABSTRACT: The present work describes a preliminary study of a primarily quartz-based Mousterian lithic assemblage deposited about 75,000 years ago by Neanderthals in Navalmaíllo rockshelter (Pinilla del Valle, Madrid, Spain). Although archaeological assemblages dominated by quartz are not common in the central Iberian Peninsula, they are more common in peripheral areas such as Catalonia and Galicia. As documented in other European sites, the abundance of quartz led to its becoming the main raw material used in tool-making in the area, even though it seems to be more difficult to knap than other, more homogeneous types of rock that fracture conchoidally. Moreover, the cores found at the Navalmaíllo site appear to have been intentionally worked to a very small size, a finding also reported for other European assemblages of similar age. The other raw materials found at the site include chert, quartzite, porphyry, rock crystal, and sandstone, all of which appear to have been worked in the same manner as the quartz. The scarcity or quality of raw materials is not the reason for this behavior.


Neanderthal Graphic Behavior: The Pecked Pebble from Axlor Rockshelter (Northern Spain).

Marcos García-Diez
Department of Geography, Prehistory and Archaeology, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria, Spain

Blanca Ochoa Fraile
Department of Geography, Prehistory and Archaeology, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria, Spain

Ignacio Barandiarán Maestu
Department of Geography, Prehistory and Archaeology, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria, Spain

KEYWORDS: Graphic behavior, Behavioral modernity, Portable art, Neanderthals, Middle Paleolithic, Northern Spain

ABSTRACT: This paper presents a study of a pecked pebble from the Middle Paleolithic recovered more than 30 years ago in Axlor rockshelter in the Spanish Basque Country. At the time of the discovery, the piece was described as being deliberately modified, but since then it has been either ignored or described only as problematic evidence of Neanderthal symbolic behavior. In this work, we provide a new description and additional documentation of the piece, and we discuss its anthropic nature and the possibility that its meaning can be related to the small but credible record of graphic behavior known for early hominin groups prior to the Upper Paleolithic in Europe. The linear design theme of the Axlor piece is similar to that of other items made by European Neanderthals. These artifacts confirm the capability of pre-Homo sapiens sapiens humans to create and use portable “art.” This tradition is evidence of the emergence of “behavioral modernity” among late Neanderthals.


Book Reviews

Wenda Trevathan: The Fragile Wisdom: An Evolutionary View on Women’s Biology and Health, by Grazyna Jasienska

Kate McGurn Centellas: Intimate Indigeneities: Race, Sex, and History in the Small Spaces of Andean Life, by Andrew Canessa

Don Robotham: Anthropology, Economics, and Choice, by Michael Chibnik

Bobby Vaughn: Chocolate and Corn Flour: History, Race, and Place in the Making of “Black” Mexico, by Laura A. Lewis.

R. David Edmunds: The Allotment Plot: Alice C. Fletcher, E. Jane Gay, and Nez Perce Survivance, by Nicole Tonkovich

Cristobal Valencia: Properties of Violence: Law and Land Grant Struggle in Northern New Mexico, by David Correia

John Arena: Markets of Sorrow, Labors of Faith: New Orleans in the Wake of Katrina, by Vincanne Adams

Kristin V. Monroe: Impossible Citizens: Dubai’s Indian Diaspora, by Neha Vora

Paul Stoller: Traveling Heavy: A Memoir in between Journeys, by Ruth Behar

Eric Gans: Emile Durkheim: A Biography, by Marcel Fournier

Amy Z. Mundorff: The Ballad of Jacob Peck, by Debra Komar

Thomas Hylland Eriksen: Creolization and Contraband: Curaçao in the Early

Modern Atlantic World, by Linda M. Rupert

Elsbeth Dowd: The Archaeology of the Caddo, Timothy K. Perttula and Chester P. Walker, eds.

David R. Wilcox: From the Land of Ever Winter to the American Southwest: Athapaskan Migrations, Mobility, and Ethnogenesis, Deni J. Seymour, ed.

Dean E. Arnold: Ancient Maya Pottery: Classification, Analysis and Interpretation, James John Aimers, ed.

Thomas Wynn: Replacement of Neanderthals by Modern Humans: Testing Evolutionary Models of Learning, Takeru Akazawa and Yoshihiro Nishiaki, eds.

Lawrence G. Straus: La Cueva de El Pindal, 1911–2011: Estudio de su Arte Rupestre Cien Años Después de Les Cavernes de la Région Cantabrique, by María González-Pumariega Solís and El Arte Paleolítico de Tito Bustillo: Cazadores y Artistas en la Cueva del Pozu’l Ramu, by Miguel Polledo González

Lawrence G. Straus: El Estrecho de Gibraltar como Puente para las Sociedades Prehistóricas, by José Ramos Muñoz

Albert E. Dien: Roman Palmyra: Identity, Community, and State Formation, by Andrew M. Smith II




Department of Anthropology