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ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH

Volume 70, Number 1, Abstracts

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Contents

George W. Stocking, Jr. (1928–2013)

Africa in the World: (Re)centering African History through Archaeology
by Ann B. Stahl

Disparate Technological Evolution of West and East: Lithic Technological Variability and Population Relations in North China during MIS 3
by Feng Li, Steven L. Kuhn, John W. Olsen, Fuyou Chen, Xing Gao

Spatial Seriation, Vectors of Change, and Multi-Centered Modeling for Cultural Transformations among San Diego’s Historical Gravestones: 50 Years after Deetz and Dethlefsen’s Archaeological Doppler Effect
by Seth Mallios

Family Alliances and “Comparatico” among a Group of Calabrian-Australian Families Living in Adelaide, South Australia
by Simone Marino and Giancarlo Chiro

Book Reviews


George W. Stocking, Jr. (1928–2013)


Africa in the World: (Re)centering African History through Archaeology

Ann B. Stahl
Department of Anthropology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC

KEYWORDS: African archaeology; Atlantic trade; Saharan trade; Connections; Networks

ABSTRACT: In early postcolonial decades, scholars of Africa’s pasts turned inward, endeavoring to demonstrate the independence of African achievement from the world. Archaeological research in particular was directed toward demonstrating Africa’s original and independent trajectories of technological, social, and political innovation, with little attention paid to Africa’s interrelations with areas outside the continent. Much has changed in recent years as scholars increasingly recognize the antiquity of the continent’s Atlantic, Mediterranean, and Indian Ocean connections. This paper explores how recent archaeological scholarship centered on the past two millennia in sub-Saharan Africa is transforming our understanding of the subcontinent’s relationship with other world regions and at the same time providing insight into the centrality of those relationships to the historical trajectories of regions outside Africa. A brief discussion of recent archaeological research is followed by an exploration of principles aimed at shifting the terrain of inquiry away from imagining Africa as a continent apart to one intimately bound up in the making of modern and ancient worlds.


Disparate Technological Evolution of West and East: Lithic Technological Variability and Population Relations in North China during MIS 3

Feng Li
Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins, Institute of Vertebrate
Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

Steven L. Kuhn
School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

John W. Olsen
School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

Fuyou Chen
Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins, IVPP, Beijing

Xing Gao
Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins, IVPP, Beijing

KEYWORDS: North China, Levallois technology, Flake technology, Middle-Upper Paleolithic transition, Population interactions, Marine Isotope Stage 3

ABSTRACT: The transition from Middle to Upper Paleolithic and the global diffusion of modern human populations remain hotly debated topics. The timing and pace of the transition in China are especially uncertain. This paper examines spatial and temporal variation among Paleolithic assemblages in North China dated to Marine Isotope Stage 3. There are two main systems of blank production in evidence: one is Levallois-like whereas the other involves simple unprepared flake cores. The Levallois-like assemblages are limited to northwest China: further dispersal of the technology was probably hindered by the presence of established populations in the eastern part of North China using long-established flake core technology. Consequently we should view North China as consisting of two geographic entities with respect to research on the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition. Changes within flake assemblages represent an independent pattern of cultural evolution, and it will be important to clarify when and how other aspects of Upper Paleolithic behavior were expressed there.


Spatial Seriation, Vectors of Change, and Multi-Centered Modeling for Cultural Transformations among San Diego’s Historical Gravestones: 50 Years after Deetz and Dethlefsen’s Archaeological Doppler Effect

Seth Mallios
Department of Anthropology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA

KEYWORDS: Archaeological Doppler effect, Deetz, Diffusion, Gravestones, San Diego (CA), Seriation

ABSTRACT: Spatial seriations of San Diego County’s historical grave markers pinpoint three simultaneous centers of primary use and a consequent tripartite transmission of a cultural trait across space and time. Using battleship diagrams and vectors of change first made popular in historical archaeology 50 years ago by Deetz and Dethlefsen (1965), this article traces how local inhabitants communicated cultural ideas of death, mourning, and commemoration across Southern California, and how these beliefs changed over time and space. Monumentalism and the celebration of death, evinced in the extremely high frequencies of large stone tablets in the cities of San Diego, Oceanside, and Ramona in the late nineteenth century, spread over time to interior areas of the county, such as El Cajon, San Marcos, and Poway. Flat, flush markers then became the dominant type of gravestone during the early and mid-twentieth century, symbolizing and expressing an emotional, intellectual, and conceptual avoidance of death, mourning, and commemoration.


Family Alliances and “Comparatico” among a Group of Calabrian-Australian Families Living in Adelaide, South Australia

Simone Marino
School of Communication, International Studies and Languages, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA

Giancarlo Chiro
School of Communication, International Studies and Languages, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA

KEYWORDS: Godparenthood, Compadrazgo, Comparatico, Calabrian-Australians, Family alliances, Cultural transmission

ABSTRACT: The present study examines baptism godparenthood, the Italian spiritual kinship system (known as comparatico) among people originating from rural areas of Calabria, southern Italy, who migrated to Adelaide, South Australia, in the 1950s and 1960s. The study specifically investigates the transmission of norms and the widespread observance of duties associated with the practice of comparatico among participants. Social relations among allied families produce social capital by generating high levels of obligations and expectations. Participants have maintained and reinforced spiritual kinship with non-kin, often originating from the same Calabrian village. The study reveals how the comparatico system evolves into an extended network influencing everyday practices. Non-consanguineous informants, after becoming compari (family allies), are bound by obligations and/or privileges involving both their private and socioeconomic lives.


Book Reviews

Rani T. Alexander: Converting Words: Maya in the Age of the Cross, by William F. Hanks

Antonio José Bacelar da Silva: Calunga and the Legacy of an African Language in Brazil, by Steven Byrd

Peter Bellwood: Causes and Consequences of Human Migration: An Evolutionary Perspective, Michael H. Crawford and Benjamin C. Campbell, eds.

Melissa Emery Thompson: Evolution and Human Sexual Behavior, by Peter B. Gray and Justin R. Garcia

Jessica Newman: Vulnerability and the Art of Protection: Embodiment and Health Care in Moroccan Households, by Mary Beth MacPhee

Carmel Schrire: Decolonizing Indigenous Histories: Exploring Prehistoric/Colonial Transitions in Archaeology, Maxine Oland, Siobhan M. Hart, and Liam Frank, eds.

Steven Mithen: Human Thought and Social Organization: Anthropology on a New Plane, by Murray J. Leaf and Dwight W. Read

Lawrence G. Straus: Solutréen et Badegoulien au Cuzoul de Vers: Des Chasseurs de Rennes en Quercy, Jean Clottes, Jean-Pierre Giraud, and Pierre Chalard, eds.

Stuart Brookes: Prestate Societies of the North Central European Plains: 600–900 CE, by Ludomir R. Lozny

Ira M. Lapidus: Near Eastern Tribal Societies during the Nineteenth Century: Economy, Society and Politics between Tent and Town, by Eveline van der Steen

Juliet E. Morrow: In the Eastern Fluted Point Tradition, Joseph A. M. Gingerich, ed.

Jenna Tedrick Kuttruff: Sandals of the Basketmaker and Pueblo Peoples: Fabric Structure and Color Symmetry, by Lynn Schuler Teague and Dorothy K. Washburn

Thomas Pozorski: Advances in Titicaca Basin Archaeology–III, Alexei Vranich, Elizabeth A. Klarich, and Charles Stanish, eds.

Lisa J. Lucero: Ancient Maya Political Dynamics, by Antonia E. Foias

Kelley Monteleone: Interpreting Ground-Penetrating Radar for Archaeology, by Lawrence B. Conyers; Magnetometry for Archaeologists, by Arnold Aspinall, Chris Gaffney, and Armin Schmidt: Earth Resistance for Archaeologist, by Armin Schmidt

Sue Fawn Chung: An Archaeology of Asian Transnationalism, by Douglas F. Ross

Jessica Chelekis: Mobility, Meaning & Transformation of Things: Shifting Contexts of Material Culture through Time and Space, Hans Peter Hahn and Hadas Weiss, eds.

Melanie Hall: Heritage in the Context of Globalization: Europe and the Americas, Peter F. Biehl and Christopher Prescott, eds.

Baker H. Morrow: Landscapes beyond Land: Routes, Aesthetics, Narratives, Arnar Árnason, Nicolas Ellison, Jo Vergunst, Andrews Whitehouse, eds.

Rusty Barrett: Parallel Worlds: Genre, Discourse, and Poetics in Contemporary, Colonial, and Classic Maya Literature, Kerry M. Hull and Michael D. Carrasco, eds.

Servando Z. Hinojosa: Indigenous Religion and Cultural Performance in the New Maya World, by Garrett W. Cook and Thomas A. Offit

R. Douglas Cope: Conflict in Colonial Sonora: Indians, Priests, and Settlers, by David Yetman

Richard Stahler-Sholk: New Approaches to Resistance in Brazil and Mexico, John Gledhill and Patience A. Schell, eds.

Paja Faudree: Beyond the Lettered City: Indigenous Literacies in the Andes, by Joanne Rappaport and Tom Cummins

Isabel M. Scarborough: Outlawed: Between Security and Rights in a Bolivian City, by Daniel M. Goldstein

Rebecca R. Stone: Mysteries of the Jaguar Shamans of the Northwest Amazon, by Robin M. Wright

Brian M. Howell: Militant Christianity: An Anthropological History, by Alice Beck Kehoe

Jianhua Zhao: Chinese Labor in a Korean Factory: Class, Ethnicity, and Productivity on the Shop Floor in Globalizing China, by Jaesok Kim

William W. Kelly: The Other Side of the Moon, by Claude Lévi-Strauss (with Foreword by Junzo Kawada, translated by Jane Marie Todd)

Noah Tsika: The Soul of Anime: Collaborative Creativity and Japan’s Media Success Story by Ian Condry

Ratna Kapur: Queer Activism in India: A Story in the Anthropology of Ethics, by Naisargi N. Dave

Sarah A. Herr: Becoming White Clay: A History and Archaeology of Jicarilla Apache Enclavement, by B. Sunday Eiselt




Department of Anthropology