Sociology Courses- Spring 2013

The University of New Mexico Catalog lists all the classes on offer at the University of New Mexico. The following is a list of courses that will be on offer from the UNM Main Campus Sociology department.

 

Table of Contents:

 

Spring 2013-Undergraduate Courses

101.001 Introduction to Sociology Williams, Jon
CRN: 12203 TR 9:30-10:45  
  Basic concepts, topics and theories of contemporary sociology. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences (NMCCN 1113)  
     
101.002 Introduction to Sociology Windsong, Elena
CRN: 12214 TR 12:30-1:45  
  Basic concepts, topics and theories of contemporary sociology. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences (NMCCN 1113)  
     
101.003 Introduction to Sociology Martin, Jean
CRN: 12230 MWF 9:00-9:50  
  Basic concepts, topics and theories of contemporary sociology. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences (NMCCN 1113)  
     
101.004 Introduction to Sociology Goodman, Ryan
CRN: 12233 MWF 11:00-11:50  
  Basic concepts, topics and theories of contemporary sociology. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences (NMCCN 1113)  
     
101.006 Introduction to Sociology Clevenger, Marie
CRN: 47180 MWF 1:00-1:50  
  Basic concepts, topics and theories of contemporary sociology. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences (NMCCN 1113)  
     
101.008 Introduction to Sociology Torrez, Diane
CRN: 41551 ONLINE 1-H of semester  
  Basic concepts, topics and theories of contemporary sociology. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences (NMCCN 1113)  
     
101.009 Introduction to Sociology Torrez, Diane
CRN: 41552 ONLINE 2-H of semester  
  Basic concepts, topics and theories of contemporary sociology. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences (NMCCN 1113)  
     
200.002 Foundations of Social Welfare Coughlin, Richard
CRN: 43356 ONLINE  
 

Overview of social welfare institutions in Western societies related to social change, stratification, economy, politics, dependency, poverty, wealth, and unemployment in U.S. and other countries; examines social work and related human service occupations.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
205.001 Crime, Public Policy & Criminal Justice Olson, Colin
CRN: 12299 TR 11:00-12:15  
 

The study of crime, the criminal justice system and crime-related public policy. Discussion of key criminological concepts, measurement of crime and delinquency, its distribution in society, victimization, public opinion, the criminal justice system, crime control strategies and policies.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
205.002 Crime, Public Policy & Criminal Justice McCue, Karen
CRN: 47245 ONLINE  
 

The study of crime, the criminal justice system and crime-related public policy. Discussion of key criminological concepts, measurement of crime and delinquency, its distribution in society, victimization, public opinion, the criminal justice system, crime control strategies and policies.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
205.004 Crime, Public Policy & Criminal Justice Nowacki, Jeffrey
CRN: 12316 MWF 1:00-1:50  
 

The study of crime, the criminal justice system and crime-related public policy. Discussion of key criminological concepts, measurement of crime and delinquency, its distribution in society, victimization, public opinion, the criminal justice system, crime control strategies and policies.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
211.001 Social Problems Erickson, Rebecca
CRN: 12316 MWF 1:00-1:50  
 

Description and analysis of major social problems facing American society. Foci may include: poverty, homelessness, alcohol and drug problems, race and ethnic relations, aging and mental illness.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
211.002 Social Problems Erickson, Rebecca
CRN: 12320 TR 11:00-12:15  
 

Description and analysis of major social problems facing American society. Foci may include: poverty, homelessness, alcohol and drug problems, race and ethnic relations, aging and mental illness.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
211.003 Social Problems Waddell, Ben
CRN: 40928 ONLINE  
 

Description and analysis of major social problems facing American society. Foci may include: poverty, homelessness, alcohol and drug problems, race and ethnic relations, aging and mental illness.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
213.001 Deviance Clevenger, Marie
CRN: 12326 MWF 12:00-12:50  
 

Survey of major forms of norm-violating behavior in American society, such as drug and alcohol abuse, mental illness, criminal behavior and sexual deviance. Discussion of sociological explantions of the causes of, and attempts to address, these behaviors

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
213.002 Deviance McCue, Karen
CRN: 47199 ONLINE  
 

Survey of major forms of norm-violating behavior in American society, such as drug and alcohol abuse, mental illness, criminal behavior and sexual deviance. Discussion of sociological explantions of the causes of, and attempts to address, these behaviors

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
213.004 Deviance McCue, Karen
CRN: 23620 TR 2:00-3:15  
 

Survey of major forms of norm-violating behavior in American society, such as drug and alcohol abuse, mental illness, criminal behavior and sexual deviance. Discussion of sociological explantions of the causes of, and attempts to address, these behaviors

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
225.001 Marriage, Family & Alternatives McCue, Karen
CRN: 39081 TR 11:00-12:15  
     
     
280.001 Intro to Research Methods Staff
CRN: 41479 MWF 1:00-1:50  
 

A survey of the major methods of social research: foundations of social research, research design, sampling and measurement, quantitative and qualitative research methods and data analysis.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
280.002 Intro to Research Methods Beals, Rebecca
CRN: 12378 TR 12:30-1:45  
 

A survey of the major methods of social research: foundations of social research, research design, sampling and measurement, quantitative and qualitative research methods and data analysis.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
280.003 Intro to Research Methods Goodman, Ryan
CRN: 12383 MWF 10:00-10:50  
 

A survey of the major methods of social research: foundations of social research, research design, sampling and measurement, quantitative and qualitative research methods and data analysis.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
280.004 Intro to Research Methods Santoro, Wayne
CRN: 12395 TR 9:30-10:45  
 

A survey of the major methods of social research: foundations of social research, research design, sampling and measurement, quantitative and qualitative research methods and data analysis.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
280.005 Intro to Research Methods Olson, Colin
CRN: 43358 ONLINE  
 

A survey of the major methods of social research: foundations of social research, research design, sampling and measurement, quantitative and qualitative research methods and data analysis.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
280.006 Intro to Research Methods Overton, Kathryn
CRN: 44349 TR 3:30-4:45  
 

A survey of the major methods of social research: foundations of social research, research design, sampling and measurement, quantitative and qualitative research methods and data analysis.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
280.007 Intro to Research Methods Olson, Colin
CRN: 47044 ONLINE  
 

A survey of the major methods of social research: foundations of social research, research design, sampling and measurement, quantitative and qualitative research methods and data analysis.

Prerequisites: 101

 
     
305.001 Environmental Sociology Schwartz, Daniel
CRN: 41480 MW 4:00-5:15  
 

Examination of humans and the environment from an ecological perspective. Focus on industrial and economic growth, natural resources development, environmental values and movements, resource management, and comparative perspective on people's relationship to the environment.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
308.002 Sociology of Gender Kawahito, Yuka
CRN: 47007 ONLINE  
     
     
310.001 Sociology of Aging & the Aged Torrez, Diana
CRN: 42151 TR 9:30-10:45  
 

Descriptive and theoretical study of the social situation of older persons in contemporary industrial societies; the impact on societal institutions of an increasing percentage of older citizens.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
312.001 Causes of Crime & Delinquency Willits, Dale
CRN: 43892 ONLINE  
 

A survey of criminological theories exploring why some people are more likely to engage in crime than others and why crime rates vary over time and space and across social groups. Attendant policy issues will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: 205 or 211 or 213

 
     
312.002 Causes of Crime & Delinquency Padilla, Alexis
CRN: 12440 MWF 1:00-1:50  
 

A survey of criminological theories exploring why some people are more likely to engage in crime than others and why crime rates vary over time and space and across social groups. Attendant policy issues will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: 205 or 211 or 213

 
     
312.003 Causes of Crime & Delinquency Rack, Christine
CRN: 38431 ONLINE  
 

A survey of criminological theories exploring why some people are more likely to engage in crime than others and why crime rates vary over time and space and across social groups. Attendant policy issues will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: 205 or 211 or 213

 
     
312.004 Causes of Crime & Delinquency Olson, Colin
CRN: 26774 TR 8:00-9:15  
 

A survey of criminological theories exploring why some people are more likely to engage in crime than others and why crime rates vary over time and space and across social groups. Attendant policy issues will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: 205 or 211 or 213

 
     
313.001 Social Control Olson, Colin
CRN: 12455 TR 9:30-10:45  
 

The study of informal and formal social control strategies for guiding and monitoring individual behavior and social interaction. Discussion of key social control agents and institutions, including the family, schools, peers, media, religion, and the criminal justice system.

Prerequisite: 205 or 211 or 213

 
     
313.002 Social Control Ulibarri, Billy
CRN: 12458 TR 2:00-3:15  
 

The study of informal and formal social control strategies for guiding and monitoring individual behavior and social interaction. Discussion of key social control agents and institutions, including the family, schools, peers, media, religion, and the criminal justice system.

Prerequisite: 205 or 211 or 213

 
     
326.001 Sociology of New Mexico Ibarra, Roberto
CRN: 27800 TR 11:00-12:15  
 

New Mexico as a social system; the infrastructure of communities and ethnic groups, stratification, major social institutions, deviance and inter-group relations

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
331.001 Social Movements Fitzpatrick, Max
CRN: 12485 MWF 1:00-1:50  
 

The study of riots, disturbances, social movements and other forms of contentious collective behavior. Strategies of conflict and conflict resolution are considered.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
331.002 Social Movements Turner, Eric
CRN: 42792 TR 11:00-12:15  
 

The study of riots, disturbances, social movements and other forms of contentious collective behavior. Strategies of conflict and conflict resolution are considered.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
331.003 Social Movements Ouassini, Anwar
CRN: 47046 ONLINE  
 

The study of riots, disturbances, social movements and other forms of contentious collective behavior. Strategies of conflict and conflict resolution are considered.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
340.001 Sociology of Medical Practice Huyser, Kimberly
CRN: 46235 W 4:00-6:30  
  An introduction to the delivery of health care in the U.S. and selected other countries is pursued with an emphasis on the interaction of patients, professionals and health care institutions.  
     
340.003 Sociology of Medical Practice Martin, Meredith
CRN: 47326 MWF 11:00-11:50  
  An introduction to the delivery of health care in the U.S. and selected other countries is pursued with an emphasis on the interaction of patients, professionals and health care institutions.  
     
340.004 Sociology of Medical Practice Padilla, Alexis
CRN: 47351 W 6:00-8:30  
  An introduction to the delivery of health care in the U.S. and selected other countries is pursued with an emphasis on the interaction of patients, professionals and health care institutions.  
     
345.001 Youth & Society Padilla, Alexis
CRN: 43830 2-Half ONLINE  
 

An assessment of the creation and dynamics of childhood and youth in human societies. Consideration of historical and cross-cultural material; and issues such as deviance and popular culture.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
345.002 Youth & Society Cutler, Carrie
CRN: 44303 MWF 1:00-1:50  
 

An assessment of the creation and dynamics of childhood and youth in human societies. Consideration of historical and cross-cultural material; and issues such as deviance and popular culture.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
354.001 Intro to Latin American Society I Schrank, Andrew
CRN: 45976 MW 4:00-5:15  
     
     
371.001 Classical Sociological Theory Ouassini, Anwar
CRN: 47047 ONLINE  
 

The study of 19th century sociological theory, with particular emphasis on Mar, Durkheim, and Weber.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
371.002 Classical Sociological Theory Jasso-Aguilar, Rebeca
CRN: 12491 MWF 9:00-9:50  
 

The study of 19th century sociological theory, with particular emphasis on Mar, Durkheim, and Weber.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
371.003 Classical Sociological Theory Barker, Kristin
CRN: 12498 1-Half TR 2:00-4:30  
 

The study of 19th century sociological theory, with particular emphasis on Mar, Durkheim, and Weber.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
371.004 Classical Sociological Theory Adele, Niame
CRN: 40930 ONLINE  
 

The study of 19th century sociological theory, with particular emphasis on Mar, Durkheim, and Weber.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
381.003 Sociological Data Analysis Azab, Mariam
CRN: 12508 TR 2:00-3:15  
 

An introduction to the basic statistics (both descriptive and inferential) employed in the analysis of quantitative sociological data.

Prerequisite: 280

 
     
381.004 Sociological Data Analysis Staff
CRN: 26783 TR 11:00-12:15  
 

An introduction to the basic statistics (both descriptive and inferential) employed in the analysis of quantitative sociological data.

Prerequisite: 280

 
     
381.006 Sociological Data Analysis Nowacki, Jeffrey
CRN: 44304 MWF 11:00-11:50  
 

An introduction to the basic statistics (both descriptive and inferential) employed in the analysis of quantitative sociological data.

Prerequisite: 280

 
     
398.004 ST: Community Organizing Wood, Richard
CRN: 44802 T 3:30-6:00  
     
     
400.001 The Welfare State Torrez, Diana
CRN: 47045 ONLINE  
     
     
412.001 Sociology of Police & Social Control Barth, Charles
CRN: 47182 1-Half TR 5:30-6:45  
     
     
414.001 Sociology of Corrections Guerin, Paul
CRN: 39076 W 9:30-12:00  
 

Study of the perspectives of corrections, its relationship to other criminal justice agencies, various forms sentencing nd punishment, corrections administration and issues in the field. Visits may be made to several facilities.

Prerequisite: 312 and 313

 
     
420.003 Race & Cultural Relations Lopez, Nancy
CRN: 42626 TR 9:30-10:45  
 

Comparative and structural analysis of intergroup relations in the United States and/or other countries and regions.

Prerequisite: 101 and 216

 
     
421.001 Sociology of Education Ibarra, Roberto
CRN: 46237 TR 2:00-3:15  
     
     
422.001 Sociology of Religion Adele, Niame
CRN: 47521 TR 2:00-3:15  
     
     
423.001 Gender & Crime Clevenger, Marie
CRN: 41481 MWF 10:00-10:50  
 

This course will outline similarities and difference in offending patterns across males and females and discuss various explanations for these differences. Discussions will also focus on the dynamics of female offending, the formal social control of female offenders and the role of women in the correctional system.

Prerequisite: 312 and 313

 
     
424.001 Race, Class, & Crime Velez, Maria
CRN: 22498 MWF 10:00-10:50  
     
     
425.001 Youth & Adult Crime Broidy, Lisa
CRN: 32810 TR 2:00-3:15  
     
     
428.001 Sociology of Mexican Americans Gonzales, Felipe
CRN: 44313 TR 3:30-4:45  
     
     
441.001 Complex Organizations Schrank, Andrew
CRN: 47379 M 7:00-9:30  
     
     
471.001 Contemporary Sociological Theory Adele, Niame
CRN: 12556 TR 12:30-1:45  
 

Comparative analysis of major contributions to sociological theory in the 20th century: Functionalism, phenomenology, French Structuralism, Analytical Marxism.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
471.002 Contemporary Sociological Theory Goodman, Ryan
CRN: 12535 MWF 12:00-12:50  
 

Comparative analysis of major contributions to sociological theory in the 20th century: Functionalism, phenomenology, French Structuralism, Analytical Marxism.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
471.003 Contemporary Sociological Theory Adele, Niame
CRN: 44034 ONLINE  
 

Comparative analysis of major contributions to sociological theory in the 20th century: Functionalism, phenomenology, French Structuralism, Analytical Marxism.

Prerequisite: 101

 
     
481L.001 Research Methods in Sociology  
CRN: 44009

Class: TR 12:30-1:45

Lab: 3:00-3:50

St. George, Art

Davis, Michael

 

Use of the computer as a tool of social research; utilization of data archives; problems of research design, instrumentation and analysis of empirical data.

Prerequisite: 280 and 381

 
     
481L.002 Research Methods in Sociology  
CRN: 44010

Class: TR 12:30-1:45

Lab: 2:00-2:50

St. George, Art

Davis, Michael

 

Use of the computer as a tool of social research; utilization of data archives; problems of research design, instrumentation and analysis of empirical data.

Prerequisite: 280 and 381

 
     
481L.007 Research Methods in Sociology  
CRN: 44030

Class: W 7:00-9:30

Lab: F 9:00-9:50

Fiala, Robert

Beals, Rebecca

 

Use of the computer as a tool of social research; utilization of data archives; problems of research design, instrumentation and analysis of empirical data.

Prerequisite: 280 and 381

 
     
481L.008 Research Methods in Sociology  
CRN: 44031

Class: W 7:00-9:30

Lab: F 10:00-10:50

 
 

Use of the computer as a tool of social research; utilization of data archives; problems of research design, instrumentation and analysis of empirical data.

Prerequisite: 280 and 381

 
     

 

Spring 2013-Graduate Courses:

507.001 T; Criminological Theory Velez, Maria
CRN: 44320 W 4:00-6:30  
 

This class offers a survey of the major schools of thought that have developed to explain criminal behavior from the emergence of modern criminology in the 18th and 19th centuries to current debates. We will examine in detail the development of 20th century criminological perspectives including human ecology/social disorganization, strain, differential association/learning, social control, developmental, labeling, and conflict theories.  While the course will focus on sociological contributions to criminological theory, psychological and biological theories will also be considered. A single semester can only provide a sampling of the vast theoretical literature in criminology.  The major objectives of the course are: to become familiar with the foundations of current theoretical debates in criminology; to describe the dominant theories in criminology; to apply the theoretical approaches considered to the explanation of crime; and to critically evaluate the theoretical approaches considered.  

 
     
510.001 Social & Political Movements Nepstad, Sharon
CRN: 46239 T 3:00-5:50  
  Social movements – whether they occur on a local, national, or international level – are about bringing people together to achieve their common interests and goals. To do this successfully, movement organizers face a variety of tasks: recruiting participants, mobilizing resources, planning strategies, assessing the political climate and conditions, and implementing collective action. An effective movement organizer must find ways to sustain motivation during setbacks, address problems of repression, and overcome obstacles to mobilization. To understand these processes, movement scholars have offered a variety of theoretical and conceptual tools. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the field of social movements. We will review social movement theories and discuss core research areas such as movement emergence and recruitment, framing of issues, collective identity and cultural work, tactics and strategies, leadership, repression, counter-movements, transnational organizing, and the biographical, social, and policy outcomes of social movements.  
     
513.001 Constructing Analystically Contemporary Sociological Theory Fiala, Robert
CRN: 46240 R 7:00-9:30  
  The course pursues two major themes: 1. A review of major issues in the construction and analysis of sociological theory; and 2. An overview of the terrain of contemporary theory. In pursuing these themes there is an effort to show the relevance of sociological theory for comprehending the social world, and to help students think about the role of sociological theory in their own work. Part I introduces the course. Part II examines the nature, elements, construction, and growth of sociological theory. Part III examines the terrain of contemporary theory by reviewing a recent textbook that reflects the way many sociologists view contemporary theory. Part IV provides a detailed assessment of the work of Anthony Giddens, Randall Collins, and Michele Lamont. Part V ends the course by asking students to once again reflect on some of major issues brought up in Part II of the course.  
     
528.001 Sociology of Mexican Americans Gonzales, Felipe
CRN: 44314 TR 3:30-4:45  
  The historical, comparative and contemporary study of the Mexican American in the U.S. Race and ethnic relations theories and the Chicano Movement.  
     
585.001 Fieldwork Methods Wood, Richard
CRN: 46241 TR 4:00-6:30  
  Research design, logic, and methods of ethnographic fieldwork in contemporary sociology. Particular attention to linking theory and data; human subjects requirements; data collection (participant-observation, interviewing, focus groups); politics and ethics of field relations. Course assumes that you have your own qualitative research project either underway or getting started, or are ready to begin developing one immediately. Rather than asking you to do research on a specific topic, this course will provide a structure within which to design and pursue your own research project. Learning qualitative research methods will involve three
components: understanding the importance of pre-research steps such as research design and informed consent procedures; learning specific data-gathering methods such as various forms of interviewing, participant-observation, ethnography, and focus groups; and studying exemplary works employing qualitative methods in their analysis.
 
     
595.001 T: Complex Organizations Schrank, Andrew
CRN: 46242 M 7:00-9:30  
  Complex organizations like schools, political parties, multinational corporations, and labor unions—not to mention the many government agencies that regulate and guide their behavior—are representative and constitutive elements of modern society. Take, for example, the United States. Americans spend almost twice as many years in school today as they did when Teddy Roosevelt was president. Over the course of the past century, therefore, the number of colleges and universities in the country has more than doubled—and well over 100,000 “one teacher public schools” have vanished. Nor is education the only example. On the eve of World War I, most babies were born at home, about a third of all Americans were self-employed, and the largest organization in the country, the Federal Government, employed a vanishingly small percentage of the civilian population. Sociology 505 addresses the growth, costs, and characteristics of complex organizations—like hospitals, regulatory agencies, and multinational corporations—that have not only rendered traditional institutions like home birth and the one-room schoolhouse all but anachronistic in the contemporary United States but have arguably put paid to traditional society more generally. We’ll read foundational texts by early twentieth century scholars like Weber, Michels, and Taylor, discuss their influence on mid-twentieth century sociologists like Lipset, Selznick, and Gouldner, and pay particularly careful attention to the origins and content of new paradigms and methods that emerged in the 1970s and 1980s.