Area of Specialization: Ecoculture


My work focuses on communication as a cultural force in the nexus of humanity and ecology.


Current Research

I’m currently working on several research projects, including:

1. Nature Tourism Discourses: Ethnographic studies focused on the interplay of communication and nature tourism, centrally concerned with ways tourism discourse reinforces or challenges Western views of, and actions toward, wildlife and ecosystems. Locations of focus include the Canada-U.S. Pacific border, Florida, and New Zealand.

2. When I say nature, I mean...: I am working with a graduate student team to analyze pedagogical free writes I have used over the years to engage students and others in discovering their own and wider environmental meaning systems.

3. Ecological Identity: I am examining the everyday disciplining of one's ecological identity and the overwhelming masking of ecocentrism.


Honors:

• US Fulbright Scholar/Fulbright New Zealand Senior Scholar. Research on ecocultural communication, ecotourism, and sustainability in New Zealand. January-June 2012.

• Christine L. Oravec Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Environmental Communication. National Communication Association. 2013. 2009.

• Critics Choice Award, American Educational Studies Association. 2013.

• Top Papers:
International Communication Association.
Environmental Communication. 2012.

National Communication Association.
Environmental Communication. 2010, 2006.

Western States Communication Association.
Environmental Communication. 2011.

Published Works: To freely read any of these publications, please go to Academia.edu

•      Milstein, T. (2015). The performer metaphor: “Mother nature never puts on the same show twice.” Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture. Online version published: volume, issue, page numbers pending.

•      Milstein, T. (2013). Book review: Arran Stibbe, Animals Erased: Discourse, Ecology, and Reconnection with the Natural World. Discourse & Society, 24 (4), 504-506.

•      Milstein, T. (2012). Banging on the divide: Cultural reflection and refraction at the zoo. In E. Plec (ed.) Perspectives on Human-Animal Interaction: Internatural Communication. (pp. 162-181). London: Routledge. (2012 Christine L. Oravec Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Environmental Communication)

•      Milstein, T. (2012). Survive, critique, and create: Guiding radical pedagogy and critical public scholarship with the discursive guideposts of ecopedagogy. Green Theory and Praxis Journal. 6 (1), 3-16.

•      Milstein, T. (2012). Greening Communication. In S.D. Fassbinder, A. J. Nocella II & R. Kahn (Eds.), Greening the Academy: Ecopedagogy through the Liberal Arts (pp. 161-174). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers. (2013 Critics Choice Award, American Educational Studies Association)

•      Milstein, T. & Dickinson, E. A. (2012). Gynocentric greenwashing: The discursive gendering of nature. Communication, Culture, & Critique. 5 (4), 510-532.

•      Milstein, T., & Kroløkke, C. (2012). Transcorporeal tourism: Whales, fetuses, and the rupturing and reinscribing of cultural constraints. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture. 6 (1), 82-100.

•      Chen, Y.W., Milstein, T., Sandoval, J., Anguiano, C., & Knudsen, L. (2012). Challenges and benefits of community-based participatory research: A case of collaboratively examining ecocultural struggles in New Mexico. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture. 6 (3), 403-421.

•      Anguiano, C., Milstein, T., De Larkin, I., Sandoval, J., & Chen, Y.W. (2012). Connecting community voices: Using a Latino/a critical race theory lens on environmental justice advocacy. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication. 6 (3), 403-421.

•      Milstein, T., Anguiano, C., Sandoval, J., Chen, Y.W., & Dickinson, E. (2011). Communicating a “new” environmental vernacular: A sense of relations-in-place. Communication Monographs. 78 (4), 486-510.

•      Milstein, T. (2011). Nature identification: The power of pointing and naming. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture. 5 (1), 3-24.

•      Milstein, T. (2009). Environmental communication theories. In Stephen Littlejohn and Karen Foss (eds.). Encyclopedia of Communication Theory (pp. 344-349). Thousand Oaks: Sage.

•      Milstein, T. (2009).
‘Somethin’ tells me it’s all happening at the zoo:’ Discourse, power, and conservationism. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture. 3 (1), 25-48.

•      Hall, D., Bernacchi, L., Milstein, T., & Peterson, T.R. (2009). Calling all artists: Moving climate change from my space to my place. In D. Endres, L. Sprain, & T.R. Peterson (eds.) Social movement to address climate change: Local steps for global action (pp. 53-80). Amherst, NY: Cambria Press.

•      Sprain, L., Norton, T., & Milstein, T. (2009). Step It Up! and image politics in the Pacific Northwest. In D. Endres, L. Sprain, & T.R. Peterson (eds.) Social movement to address climate change: Local steps for global action (pp. 281-308). Amherst, NY: Cambria Press.

•      Milstein, T. (2008). When whales “speak for themselves”: Communication as a mediating force in wildlife tourism. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture.
2 (2), 173-192. (2009 Christine L. Oravec Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Environmental Communication)

•      Milstein, T. (2008). The nature inside our heads: Exploring possibilities for widespread cultural paradigm shifts about nature. Drain: Journal of Contemporary Art and Culture (Sustainability Issue), 10.

•      Milstein, T. (2007). Human Communication's Effects on Relationships with Animals . In Marc Bekoff (ed.) Encyclopedia of Human-Animal Relationships: A Global Exploration of Our Connections with Animals. (Vol. 3, pp. 1044-1054). Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group.