Area of Specialization: Ecoculture


My work focuses on communication as a cultural force in the nexus of humanity and ecology.


Current Research

I’m currently working on several research projects, including:

1. Nature Tourism Discourses: Ethnographic research centrally concerned with ways tourism discourse reinforces or challenges Western views of, and actions toward, wildlife and ecosystems. Locations of focus include the Canada-U.S. Pacific border, Florida, Hawai'i, Australia, and New Zealand.

2. Ecological Identity: Theoretical and qualitative research examining the everyday production of individual orientations toward the more than human world.

3. When I say nature, I mean...: Analysis of pedagogical free writes to illuminate individual and wider cultural environmental meaning systems. In addition to this study, being undertaken collaboratively with two PhD students and a geography and environmental studies colleague, these free writes from my courses have inspired several talented graduate students to create an engaging performance piece.


Honors:

• US Fulbright Scholar/Fulbright New Zealand Senior Scholar. Ecotourism and sustainability in New Zealand. January-June 2012.

• Christine L. Oravec Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Environmental Communication. National Communication Association. 2013. 2009.

• Critics Choice Award, American Educational Studies Association. 2013.

• Top Papers:
International Communication Association.
Environmental Communication. 2012.

National Communication Association.
Environmental Communication. 2010, 2006.

Western States Communication Association.
Environmental Communication. 2011.

Sample Published Works: To freely read these publications, please go to Academia.edu

•      Milstein, T. (2016). The performer metaphor: “Mother nature never gives us the same show twice.” Environmental Communication, 10 (2), 227-248.

•      Milstein, T. (2016, May 31). Is nature really the greatest show on Earth? [Web log post]. Center for Humans & Nature.

•      Milstein, T. (2015, November 13). From SeaWorld to the wild, a nature-as-performer metaphor holds sway [Web log post]. International Environmental Communication Association, Taylor & Francis.

•      Milstein, T. (2013). Book review: Arran Stibbe, Animals Erased: Discourse, Ecology, and Reconnection with the Natural World. Discourse & Society, 24 (4), 504-506.

•      Milstein, T. (2012). Banging on the divide: Cultural reflection and refraction at the zoo. In E. Plec (ed.) Perspectives on Human-Animal Interaction: Internatural Communication. (pp. 162-181). London: Routledge. (2012 Christine L. Oravec Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Environmental Communication)

•      Milstein, T. (2012). Survive, critique, and create: Guiding radical pedagogy and critical public scholarship with the discursive guideposts of ecopedagogy. Green Theory and Praxis Journal. 6 (1), 3-16.

•      Milstein, T. (2012). Greening Communication. In S.D. Fassbinder, A. J. Nocella II & R. Kahn (Eds.), Greening the Academy: Ecopedagogy through the Liberal Arts (pp. 161-174). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers. (2013 Critics Choice Award, American Educational Studies Association)

•      Milstein, T. & Dickinson, E. A. (2012). Gynocentric greenwashing: The discursive gendering of nature. Communication, Culture, & Critique. 5 (4), 510-532.

•      Milstein, T., & Kroløkke, C. (2012). Transcorporeal tourism: Whales, fetuses, and the rupturing and reinscribing of cultural constraints. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture. 6 (1), 82-100.

•      Chen, Y.W., Milstein, T., Sandoval, J., Anguiano, C., & Knudsen, L. (2012). Challenges and benefits of community-based participatory research: A case of collaboratively examining ecocultural struggles in New Mexico. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture. 6 (3), 403-421.

•      Anguiano, C., Milstein, T., De Larkin, I., Sandoval, J., & Chen, Y.W. (2012). Connecting community voices: Using a Latino/a critical race theory lens on environmental justice advocacy. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication. 6 (3), 403-421.

•      Milstein, T., Anguiano, C., Sandoval, J., Chen, Y.W., & Dickinson, E. (2011). Communicating a “new” environmental vernacular: A sense of relations-in-place. Communication Monographs. 78 (4), 486-510.

•      Milstein, T. (2011). Nature identification: The power of pointing and naming. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture. 5 (1), 3-24.

•      Milstein, T. (2009). Environmental communication theories. In Stephen Littlejohn and Karen Foss (eds.). Encyclopedia of Communication Theory (pp. 344-349). Thousand Oaks: Sage.

•      Milstein, T. (2009).
‘Somethin’ tells me it’s all happening at the zoo:’ Discourse, power, and conservationism. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture. 3 (1), 25-48.

•      Hall, D., Bernacchi, L., Milstein, T., & Peterson, T.R. (2009). Calling all artists: Moving climate change from my space to my place. In D. Endres, L. Sprain, & T.R. Peterson (eds.) Social movement to address climate change: Local steps for global action (pp. 53-80). Amherst, NY: Cambria Press.

•      Sprain, L., Norton, T., & Milstein, T. (2009). Step It Up! and image politics in the Pacific Northwest. In D. Endres, L. Sprain, & T.R. Peterson (eds.) Social movement to address climate change: Local steps for global action (pp. 281-308). Amherst, NY: Cambria Press.

•      Milstein, T. (2008). When whales “speak for themselves”: Communication as a mediating force in wildlife tourism. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture.
2 (2), 173-192. (2009 Christine L. Oravec Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Environmental Communication)

•      Milstein, T. (2008). The nature inside our heads: Exploring possibilities for widespread cultural paradigm shifts about nature. Drain: Journal of Contemporary Art and Culture (Sustainability Issue), 10.

•      Milstein, T. (2007). Human Communication's Effects on Relationships with Animals . In Marc Bekoff (ed.) Encyclopedia of Human-Animal Relationships: A Global Exploration of Our Connections with Animals. (Vol. 3, pp. 1044-1054). Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group.